Quantcast
return Home

How magazine media fits into the ‘new advertising game’

Rob Candelino ()

Something “profound positive” has changed in the magazine media industry in the past 18 months a top Unilever executive told the American Magazine Media 360º Conference in New York on Tuesday.

Rob Candelino (pictured), vice president of marketing, haircare at Unilever, was part of a panel on advertising including Lori Hiltz, chief executive officer of Havas Media and Michael Clinton, president of marketing and publishing director, Hearst Magazines. Michael Kassan, chairman and chief executive officer of MediaLink moderated the session.

FIPP's Cobus Heyl reports.

Candelino told how, for years, he never met publishers. Today he does it regularly. He said magazine media have “fantastic print and relevant omni-channels” [multiple platform products], which, today, stands them in good stead.

He also lauded innovation within the industry: “Lately, there is real ground-breaking innovation coming from within the magazine media industry, whereas previously it only came from newer players. You have made print and all of its media channels very relevant for a guy like me.”

According to Candelino there “has never been this embarrassment of riches for advertisers” (options to choose from). Within this, pioneering spirit is important. 

“Unilever likes to be pioneers by looking at new opportunities in all channels.” Today, magazine media fits the bill. “We will continue to work with the Hearsts and Condés doing ground-breaking work.” A key factor in this change is an openness “at the other side of the table (i.e. publishers)” to doing pioneering work. This “did not exist 3 – 5 years ago.”

Hearst Magazines’ Clinton highlighted the fact that magazine media today have opportunity to tap into more advertising budgets than ever before, to attract print, digital, social, event and video budget spend. “There is a lot [of ad budgets] we did not have access to before.” This means a “big opportunity” of magazine media to put together integrated, omni-channel campaigns for clients.

One inevitable question was on the role of native advertising, with its proponents for and against, and the ways in which magazine media are engaged with it. 

Candelino said “what the magazine media industry should be celebrated for is that you were native before native was cool. What you should be criticised for, is losing ownership of the narrative… You were doing advertorials long before.” It took a while for magazine media to “get at it again”, but it is good that the industry is now part of the narrative again.

For Clinton there is simply no question that magazine media have to be involved with it. “We have got to be in the space, all of us, because the world around us is in the space.” Companies should “be transparent (about native advertising), but we have to reinvent and be a part of it. Shame on us if we do not.”

Storytelling is in magazine media’s DNA and the industry is therefore well suited to the development of quality native advertising. “There is a lot of content out there, but with all respect some of it is sub-standard. Looking at [the MPA’s magazine media awards] last night, we have immense value to bring.”

Turning their attention to the development of “brands as publishers”, Hiltz referred to the blurring of lines in the industry, for example with brands producing content. In the end, with the ongoing change publishers, agencies and brands have to continually evolve their business. “Brands as publishers” is one of those areas “where it will be interesting to see how things play out.”

Clinton added that “publishing” is easier said than done, which leaves scope for cooperation. “To get the stick-ability, the engagement and return is a big challenge, even for people who do it for a living [like magazine media]. But if we come together, at the intersection of the two, that’s where magic will happen.”

Turning attention to the impact of developments such as the Internet of Things, a question was how, as an example, “a talking bottle of shampoo” might change marketing. Candelino responded that while things are often positioned as a zero sum game, it is not. 

Therefore, something like connected products can serve as a multiplier, an additional opportunity rather than detracting from somewhere else. People will engage in various different ways, but “like at a dinner party where you meet many different people, you will end up with who you like.” 

Brands, such as magazine media, must therefore go back to “what makes you special as a brand,” and then expand it “everywhere” to create opportunities to engage and make an impact.

Speaking of the immediate future, Clinton emphasised that on the print side of business relationships with consumers have never been stronger than it is today. However, companies have to continue to refine strategies and innovate and take care for legacy not to become a drag. “We have to think more like pureplays and not about our legacy. We need to think of all platforms to build value.”

More about MPA’s 360 conference.

We recently launched the new FIPP.com (in beta, while doing live testing and refinements). The relaunch is not only about look and feel, but even more so about us providing a platform to further enable the sharing of ideas, insights and opinions within our global network. If you have a story to tell, or are interested in contributing to FIPP.com on a regular basis, get in touch with our communications manager, Amy Duffin.

  • Online video has no fixed home, it reaches as far and wide as the mobile phone Yesterday, we looked at Twitter’s decision to extend the maximum video length of Vine from six to 140 seconds. This represents a big leap in the platform’s evolution and arguably removes its key USP. In doing so Vine and parent company Twitter are making a stark play for the centre ground, gambling a successful niche offering for fame and fortune in the online video mainstream. The question is, particularly with Twitter stock now coming under such heavy scrutiny from the financial markets, will it work? 1st Jul 2016 MagWorld
  • Vine breaks six second limit as video war heats up It was recently announced that both Twitter and Vine will soon be allowing users to upload videos of up to 140 seconds in length. This is a bold move for a product suite that holds short, snappy content as its USP, and particularly in the case of Vine (Twitter videos can already be up to 30 seconds) represents a notable transformation. It is however also an indicative one, because as online video moves increasingly into the media mainstream, it is an inevitable step to see its key protagonists jostling to occupy the middle ground. 30th Jun 2016 MagWorld
  • 7awi joins the FIPP family Integrated digital content platform 7awi came into existence four years ago to fill a void in platforms for Arabic language web content publishing. Today it’s one of the largest digital Arabic language publishers in the Middle East and North Africa. Recently joining FIPP, chief executive and co-founder Anas Abbar spoke to Piet van Niekerk.   29th Jun 2016 MagWorld
  • Three questions publishers have about Snapchat Discover In pretty much every major publisher office around the globe at the moment questions are being asked about Snapchat. The image-driven social network has now become so popular - it recently overtook Twitter in number of active users - that media companies, especially those who target younger demographics, can no longer afford to ignore it. Yet using Snapchat to extend brand awareness and attract new readers, well it isn't that straightforward. 28th Jun 2016 MagWorld
  • Magazines with changing formats, models are still magazines It has been an interesting month for magazines when it comes to formats and business models. First, Rodale announced its 66-year-old Prevention magazine was going ad-free. Secondly, a funny offering from Canada announced it would print a content-free model. Thirdly, Snapchat decided to launch a digital magazine that would live on the web. 28th Jun 2016 MagWorld
  • Three questions publishers have about Snapchat Discover In pretty much every major publisher office around the globe at the moment questions are being asked about Snapchat. The image-driven social network has now become so popular - it recently overtook Twitter in number of active users - that media companies, especially those who target younger demographics, can no longer afford to ignore it. Yet using Snapchat to extend brand awareness and attract new readers, well it isn't that straightforward. 28th Jun 2016 MagWorld
  • One third of all revenues will be native advertising by 2018 According to new research from Native Advertising Institute (NAI) in association with FIPP, native advertising will make up one third of all advertising revenue in the global magazine industry by 2018.  22nd Jun 2016 FIPP News
  • IBT Media on how a transparent approach to financial and business news is providing success IBT Media is the publisher of both Newsweek and the International Business Times, as well as a growing portfolio of additional titles. With more than 90 million monthly global readers and an international workforce of 300+ employees its transparent, no nonsense approach to financial and business news is paying off. We caught up with Mitchell Caplan, the publisher’s chief marketing officer, to find out how the company has become so successful in such a short space of time and how it is evolving its content. 23rd Jun 2016 MagWorld
  • Chart of the week: Paying for online news picks up People are still not too fond of paying to be informed online. Though, according to research by Bitkom in Germany, people aren’t altogether averse to parting with money for content and do so already. 36 percent of respondents in a recent poll said they paid for journalistic content online. Some had subscriptions, while others paid for individual articles or whole digital issues. 28th Jun 2016 Insight News
Go to Full Site