Quantcast
return Home

African publishers take content global

Independent African publishers and authors face a unique set of challenges and limitations; on a continent where even school textbooks necessary for basic education do not ever reach their destination, and where the culture of reading is so woefully weak and undervalued that in some areas illiteracy is still a major obstacle.

Independent African publishers and authors face a unique set of challenges and limitations; on a continent where even school textbooks necessary for basic education do not ever reach their destination, and where the culture of reading is so woefully weak and undervalued that in some areas illiteracy is still a major obstacle. This restricts their market to only local bookshops and outlets, which leads to the limitation and even the strangling of their content's potential.

Many African publishers have successfully taken advantage of digital distribution to combat this problem; however there are still some that are lagging behind the curve. Very little African content ever makes it to the international market via traditional publishing, but digital publishing renders all size publishers equal, allowing them to compete in the digital sphere amongst some of the largest publishing houses internationally.

Great potential in Africa's digital publishing future
More and more digital publishing solutions are adjusting their offering to enable local authors and publishers to take their content online. Effectively providing them with the platform to monetize their content and transgress the geographical boundaries that traditional publishing is limited to and instead freeing their content by offering it on mobile stores like Apple, Android, and BlackBerry, to a readership that spans the globe.

Not only will the rest of the world now have access to genuine African content; but with the introduction of more and more affordable e-reading devices, including tablets with e-reader apps, we will see more Africans reading local content. Already the increase in digital sales of this content is encouraging. More affordable eReaders and tablets in Africa should encourage the uptake of local eBooks, which will have a positive effect on the continents' reading habits.

Many independent African publishers embracing digital
Snapplify is an African-based digital publishing company, with partners all over the globe, that has played a major role in helping numerous local publishers and authors leverage their digital publishing platform to give their content the global push. Not only does this mean they will experience international traction, but because Snapplify supports Android (the dominating OS in Africa)  there will soon be a proliferation of accessible local content available on the mobile stores.

Some independent African publishing clients thriving on the Snapplify digital publishing platform include Mampoer shorts, Big Bug Books, iOL, Nollybooks in Nigeria, and AfriBooks (launched in collaboration with Burnet Media and Snapplify partner, Berg + Bach).

Tim Richman, MD of Burnet Media said: "Digital publishing in South Africa is in something of a no-man's land at the moment. There is a steadily increasing market, but it appears to be more interested in buying international titles rather than local. We believe AfriBooks offers a great opportunity to take easily accessible, well-priced content to a wider audience, both within South Africa and abroad."
  • How the role of the publisher is changing Traditionally, publishers are responsible for the overall performance of their publications, for driving growth and strategy, and leadership of the editorial teams. Publishers manage the business and keep their magazine and media brands financially and commercially successful. But, as the business evolves, publishers are increasingly facing challenges. In this digital reality, keeping a global enterprise viable financially is a challenge. Audiences and platforms are constantly changing. 23rd Aug 2016 MagWorld
  • Native advertising takes to the airwaves When two trends collide, interesting opportunities emerge. This is very much the case for the twin trends of podcasting and branded content, where the former is becoming a force to be reckoned with. 23rd Aug 2016 MagWorld
  • The evolution of the paywall: From blunt instruments to sophisticated, creative solutions We spoke to Peter Richards, chief revenue officer of Piano about paywalls in 2016, and how personalisation has played a significant part in their evolution. 29th Aug 2016 MagWorld
  • Meet the 67-year-old French weekly using vintage content to find new audiences online Paris Match is a 67-year-old publication that begin life as a weekly news title. However in the modern day, its seamless blend of political content with celebrity news makes it ideal fodder for new online audiences. We spoke to Marion Mertens, senior digital editor for Paris Match, about updating the product for the digital age including apps, Instagram Vintage accounts, and Facebook livestreaming of fashion events. 25th Aug 2016 MagWorld
  • Chart of the week: Mobile trials and tribulations faced by publishers Ad blocking is thought of as a problem confined to the world of desktop PCs. However, according to a survey of 300 publishers of premium content in the USA those worries also prevail in the mobile arena. Indeed, ad blocking turns out to be the primary cause for concern cited by half the publishers asked, when thinking about the distribution of their content on mobile devices. 23rd Aug 2016 Insight News
Go to Full Site