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Chart of the week: Why do consumers break up with brands? The customer is king and as such can be hard on any brand that doesn't fulfill his or her expectations to the fullest. According to a new report by SAP Hybris (https://www.hybris.com/medias/sys_master/root/h5d/hca/8824150687774/consumer-insight-survey-global-17-EN.pdf), customers worldwide have several reasons to turn their backs on brands. The top no go for brands is using data consumers confided in them without their knowledge or permission. Eighty per cent of respondents worldwide said this was the number one reason to divorce. "Now that brands are able to collect data about consumers, how they use that data becomes critical," the report concludes. An unresponsive customer service is the second most acute reason customers terminate their relations with a brand (71 per cent). There is other brand behaviour that might not lead to consumers shunning the brand altogether, but which still is seen as annoying. The top two spots have to do with a marketing and sales overkill: 60 and 50 per cent of consumers respectively are either bothered by too many direct marketing calls or too frequent sales emails.
Chart of the week: Media side of ad campaigns grows more important Running an ad campaign is a pretty intricate undertaking. Many variables contribute to either success or failure. In general, you can discern three broad parts you need to consider. Firstly, you have the actual creative good, the advertisement itself. Secondly, you have the media planning aspect, as you need to decide how, where and when to get the ad out. Last but not least, as you don't start at zero, but are most likely working with an established brand, you have preexisting specifics (e.g. price or brand penetration). According to a recent study by Nielsen, there is a shift taking place as to which aspect is deemed how important in contributing to a lift in sales. While the creative aspect of the campaign still is the most important factor (49 per cent), ten years ago this side of the campaign was thought to contribute up to 65 per cent. Nielsen argues due to breakthroughs in data and technology "media is playing a much larger role than before." 500 packaged goods campaigns were considered for the study. https://www.ncsolutions.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/NCS_Five-Keys-to-Advertising-Effectiveness.pdf
Chart of the week: Facebook is still the fastest growing social media network It may not be as hip as Snapchat or Instagram, but Facebook is still a must-have channel for publishers trying to reach a large audience. The world’s largest social network just keeps on growing and now has more than 2.07 billion users around the world. Facebook may seem like the slow behemoth that can no longer keep up with the explosive growth of younger platforms, but in fact no other social media platform added more users than Facebook over the past two years. As the following chart by Statista shows, Facebook added 527 million monthly active users in the past two years – that is considerably more than Twitter’s entire user base (330 million). And it’s not just sheer size that speaks for Facebook. According to a survey conducted by the Audience Project in the United States, Facebook is also the most engaging social media platform. Fifty-three per cent of the respondents said that they open the Facebook app at least several times a day. Snapchat only reaches 34 per cent in that regard.
Chart of the week: What prompts people to turn off their ad-blockers? At first glance, tough love seems to be the way forward for online media to get users to turn off their ad-blockers. Fifty-eight per cent of respondents in a Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (RISJ) poll said that they turned off their ad-blocker, at least temporarily, if there was no other way to view the website or content. But explaining to users that the ad money is needed to fund the website can get publishers places too. Twenty-six per cent of users said they switched off the blocker when notified the website depended on the ad funds. The good news is that there are ways to get users to comply with the rules of indirect funding. However, this doesn't mean that users will start loving ads because they were in some way coerced (or kindly asked) to turn off their ad-blockers. Then again, 43 per cent of respondents said they switched off their blockers for particular news sites, meaning that news media could profit from investing in a relationship with users. It seems, some users surf with an ad-shield by default, but are willing to let down their guard if the targeted website is trusted. https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/sites/default/files/Digital%20News%20Report%202017%20web_0.pdf?utm_source=digitalnewsreport.org&utm_medium=referral
DI Tour pocket programme as at 24 October 2017 DI Tour pocket programme as at 24 October 2017
Chart of the week: Feeling tracked and the counter-measures against ads The internet has opened up untold benefits for marketers and the online advertising industry. The data trail provided by possible consumers makes targeting specific audiences easy. This way personalised advertising can help the industry maximize the return on ad spend. However, the consumer doesn't always feel comfortable with being followed around the web. According to the "Statista Survey Advertising & Privacy 2017" (https://www.statista.com/study/49088/personalized-advertising/), 86 per cent of respondents often or occasionally realise that their online behaviour is being tracked and used for ads. While 37 per cent do not take any counter-measures, the remaining 63 per cent take action, such as using an incognito window in their browser, to shake off the digital tail. Albeit, only 14 per cent do this always. Contrasting the findings of other studies there are people out there who are rather spooked out by personalised ads, or knowing that they're being followed. Digital media, marketing their web space for personalised ads, need to at least acknowledge that some of their audience is aware and wary of being followed. And, the customer cannot be coerced to be turned on by cookies.
FIPP World Congress 2017 speaker presentation: Geoff Ramsey, eMarketer Building a pure-play B2B subscription model from the ground up
FIPP World Congress 2017 speaker presentation: Jennifer Dunleavy and Richard Thomas, Time Inc. UK Live the passion
FIPP World Congress 2017 speaker presentation: Joanna Abeyie, Hyden Talent How diversity contributes to business success
FIPP World Congress 2017 speaker presentation: Rui (Yuri) Ou, Linkup China What user innovation on WeChat can teach publishers
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