Viewing Resources By Subject - chart of the week


chart of the week

Chart of the week: Digital news subscriptions are a potent revenue generator As a media company, building a sustainable digital business model relying on monthly subscriptions for a long time seemed like a fantasy. But as our chart shows, the New York Times, next to other national and international news media brands, gives proof to a concept which for many is the key to survival for independent journalism. Whilst international English language newspapers like the New York Times or the the Wall Street Journal are topping the list subscriber-wise, the ranking shows that digital subscriptions also are a valid tool for national newspapers to generate revenue. Ranking fifth, Germany’s Bild boasts almost 400,000 subscribers - each paying the equivalent of US$5.83 per month. This week's chart comes from the first ever Global Digital Subscription Snapshot, a research produced by FIPP and CeleraOne: https://www.fipp.com/news/insightnews/digital-subscription-revenue-displacing-digital-advertising
Chart of the week: The acceptance of paying for news is growing worldwide Making users pay for online news content isn’t impossible – but remains difficult. While many news outlets are still hesitant to charge their users, data compiled by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (RISJ) indicates that become more and more accepted globally. However, the willingness to pay for news differs by region. Whilst people in Nordic countries are highly interested in paid for subscriptions, the United Kingdom has the least penetration of online subscriptions and other forms of pay-to-view models.
Chart of the week: Is TV's reign nearing its end? Averaging almost eight hours a day, people around the world spend more time consuming media than ever before. That’s according to data recently published by Zenith, which also points out an interesting trend in media consumption. For decades, TV was the undisputed number one in terms of daily media usage, and it still is. However, as internet consumption (both mobile and desktop) has risen sharply over the past decade, it looks as though TV’s reign could soon be coming to an end. According to Zenith's latest media consumption forecast, the gap in daily consumption, which was 27 minutes last year, could shrink to just 13 minutes this year and completely vanish by 2019. In line with the old advertising adage “money follows eyeballs”, online advertising expenditure is also on the rise and, according to Zenith, surpassed TV ad spending for the first time in 2017.
Chart of the week: How public and journalists' views on the media's duties diverge Journalists have an exact idea of the civic duties their trade must fulfil. But as a survey by the Media Insight Project found, these ideas are diverging from the public opinion of a journalist’s duties. Even though the news caste and the public can agree that the news landscape shall remain neutral, be fair to every side and shall check facts, it’s the journalist’s exclusive opinion that they must act as a watchdog for those in power and provide different ways to interpret a certain topic. However, these duties are of lower priority to the public.
Chart of the week: Marketers have yet to embrace Snapchat Aside from Snapchat’s lackluster user growth and Facebook’s seemingly successful strategy of copying anything that Snapchat does well, there’s growing concern about the platform’s appeal to marketers (and hence its monetisation prospects). According to a recent report by the Social Media Examiner, just eight per cent of marketers used Snapchat in the first quarter of 2018, which is worlds apart from Facebook’s 94 per cent adoption rate and far behind the 66 per cent of marketers that are active on Instagram. Making things worse, 72 per cent of the respondents have no plans of using Snapchat in the next 12 months, indicating that marketers do not consider it relevant enough to give it a try. The data follows a controversial redesign and less than stellar results during Snap's first year as a public company.
Chart of the week: Size doesn't matter to media startups Twitter is almost a legacy media outlet compared to the younger startups in the media landscape. Its clout can be well measured in a revenue per employee (RPE) ranking. The San Francisco based company does not just dwarf the up-starts in its realm but even outcompetes the good old New York Times. Then again, Twitter doesn’t send full-time reporters to relay news from the hot spots of this world. It is low on cost-intensive own content production. Producing quality news is a completely different kettle of fish than just relaying other people’s news – and obviously less cost effective.
Chart of the week: How China's social media giant compares to Facebook Chinese social media and gaming company Tencent reported its first quarter earnings earlier this month, surpassing analyst expectations and sending its stock price soaring. Due to the fact that social media services such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat are inaccessible in China, there exists a whole ecosystem of social networking and messaging platforms that are immensely popular in and around China but hardly known anywhere else in the world. Platforms such as QQ, Qzone and WeChat in particular have hundreds of millions of users and, just as Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp, they’re all owned by the same company. Their parent company Tencent first became China’s largest tech company in terms of market capitalisation in 2016, and is currently going back and forth with ecommerce behemoth Alibaba in the race for this title. As our chart illustrates, there's no need for Tencent to shy away from comparisons with the world's largest social networking company. While WeChat has just passed the billion-user mark and is trailing the world's largest social network by more than a billion users, the company's financial results are nearly on par with Facebook's. Tencent reported revenue of US$11.7 billion and a net profit of $3.8 billion for the first quarter of 2018, compared to Facebook's $12.0 and $5.0 billion, respectively. From an investing standpoint, Tencent has outperformed its American counterpart in the past 12 months: the company's stock price climbed 60 per cent since May 2017, Facebook's is up by "just" 23 per cent. https://www.statista.com/chart/5549/tencent-vs-facebook/
Chart of the week: Paywalls and the acceptance of paying for news Making user pay for online news content isn’t impossible – but remains difficult. While many news outlets are still hesitant to charge their users, data compiled by the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (RISJ) indicates that in some countries paywalls can be a potent tool to tackle declining revenues. However, the willingness to pay for news differs by region. Whilst people in Nordic countries are highly interested in paid for subscriptions, the United Kingdom has the least penetration of online subscriptions and other forms of pay-to-view models. When asked why, 54 per cent of respondents said that there were enough free sources to get news from. http://www.digitalnewsreport.org/survey/2017/paying-for-news-2017/
Chart of the week: People think outside groups are planting fake news People interviewed for a poll by Monmouth University believe that mainstream media and social media platforms alike are threatened by outside groups and agents trying to plant fake news stories. While this shows that many people think there’s a profound problem with intentionally disseminated disinformation, the data does not show how good the respondents think the media was at rooting out fake news. This in mind, on social media, anybody can write or forward anything. There is no fact checking prior to publication. If at all, posts or comments are taken down after publication, often because they are in breach of platform rules. On the contrary, most journalistic news outlets have verification procedures in place in order to filter out factual errors before publication. While legacy news outlets often entertain separate fact-checking departments, such measures are relatively new to social media platforms or, if installed, cannot keep up with the wealth of content produced by users. https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.mediapost.com/uploads/monmouthpoll_us_040218.pdf
Chart of the week: The EU's most trusted news sources Amid the ongoing Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook is firmly in the firing line for enabling the spread of disinformation on their platform. Indeed, when it comes to trust in news sources in the EU, a new survey by the European Commission has social networks and messaging apps firmly at the bottom. Only 26 per cent of respondents said they 'totally' or 'tend to' trust sites such as Facebook and Twitter when it comes to news. On the other end of the scale, news broadcast over the radio and televised news are still held in high regard, both are trusted to some degree by 70 and 66 per cent, respectively. The printed news sources aren't far behind with 63 per cent. These findings give legacy publishers and broadcasters an edge over new digital outlets that relay information and news without any trained gatekeepers to filter out the fake news. http://ec.europa.eu/commfrontoffice/publicopinion/index.cfm/Survey/getSurveyDetail/instruments/FLASH/surveyKy/2183
Go to Full Site