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Fake news

Chart of the week: The EU's most trusted news sources Amid the ongoing Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook is firmly in the firing line for enabling the spread of disinformation on their platform. Indeed, when it comes to trust in news sources in the EU, a new survey by the European Commission has social networks and messaging apps firmly at the bottom. Only 26 per cent of respondents said they 'totally' or 'tend to' trust sites such as Facebook and Twitter when it comes to news. On the other end of the scale, news broadcast over the radio and televised news are still held in high regard, both are trusted to some degree by 70 and 66 per cent, respectively. The printed news sources aren't far behind with 63 per cent. These findings give legacy publishers and broadcasters an edge over new digital outlets that relay information and news without any trained gatekeepers to filter out the fake news. http://ec.europa.eu/commfrontoffice/publicopinion/index.cfm/Survey/getSurveyDetail/instruments/FLASH/surveyKy/2183
Chart of the week: Trust in platforms vs journalism Worldwide, seven out of ten respondents worry that fake news or false information could be used as a weapon. Also, 59 per cent say that it is getting harder to tell if a piece of news was produced by a respected media organisation. Overall, media has lost some trust, however, according to the Edelman Trust Barometer Report, journalism (i.e. traditional media and online-only media) is regaining some trust in comparison with platforms, understood as search engines and social media (such as Google, YouTube, Yahoo, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) Trust in journalism jumped five points year-over-year while trust in platforms dipped two points. However, one major problem is that the boundaries between these forms of media are blurring. “Some people consider platforms to be part of ‘the media’ — including social media (48 per cent) and search engines (25 per cent) — alongside journalism (89 per cent), which includes publishers and news organisations.” Most likely, the fall-off of trust in social and search, and of the credibility of peer communication, are contributing to the overall decline of trust in media, according to Edelman. https://www.edelman.com/trust-barometer
Chart of the week: Views on 'fake news' 'Fake news' is all over the news. Not just because some observers think that media organisations have a habit of spreading things that don't represent the real world. Also, because the media of course is pretty worried about its standing with the general public, who it (for the most part) tries to inform to the best of its abilities. As our chart shows, most British people taking part in a recent YouGov survey (https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/03/23/what-counts-fake-news/) think that organisations who deliberately spread things that aren't true are engaged with 'fake news'. On the other hand those organisations that are perceived to be honest but have a clear political viewpoint or agenda cannot be counted as spreading 'fake news'. The lesson to be learnt here is that you shouldn't label news organisations 'fake news' just because they convey views that you dislike. This applies to the general public but should especially be heeded by influential people in the limelight.
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