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The Economist announces line-up of speakers for its Open Future Festival

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The Economist announced the first round of speakers for its Open Future Festival, a live-streamed event taking place on 15 September in Hong Kong, London and New York.

The Open Future Festival will host discussions on the most urgent issues of our time, and will consider the future of freedom, individual rights, trade and technology with speakers representing many sides of the debate.

The Open Future Festival was born out of The Economist’s Open Future initiative, which aims to remake the case for classical liberal values and policies in the 21st century. Through articles, online debates, essays and films contests, The Economist’s Open Future initiative has explored the future of capitalism, free speech, diversity, identity politics, immigration and technology. An essay on the future of liberalism written by The Economist’s editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, will be published in September to coincide with the festival.

 

 

The Economist is encouraging people from all walks of life to attend the Open Future Festival and take part in the conversation.

The festival will feature a diverse roster of speakers from academia, business, government, journalism, the arts and non-profit sectors, including Amber Heard, actress and activist; Mustafa Suleyman, co-founder of Google DeepMind; Larry Summers, former US treasury secretary; Joshua Wong, secretary-general of Demosisto; and Nick Clegg, former UK deputy prime minister. For the full list of speakers in each city, go to the Hong Kong, London and New York sites. 

Guests who attend the Open Future Festival in person will be able to participate in talks, interactive exhibitions, immersive experiences, debates and networking while those watching the live stream will be able to experience the full agenda across all three cities beginning in Hong Kong, moving on to London and finishing up in New York. 

 

 

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