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DCN: Americans want platforms to be transparent about the content in their news feeds

Americans recognise the tremendous power that internet companies like Google, Facebook, and Twitter have over the news and information obtained on these platforms and they question the practice of filtered content. Via Digital Content Next

The Knight Foundation and Gallup examine consumer opinion on curated content in their new report, Major Internet Companies as News Editors. The research shows that consumers are more negative (54 per cent) than positive (45 per cent) about the idea of major internet companies targeting information to individual users based on their interests, internet search activity, and web browsing history.

Interestigly, younger respondents are slightly more positive about receiving targeted information (51 per cent) compared to adults, ages 35 to 54 (46 per cent) and adults 55+ (39 per cent). However, across demographics, on thing is for certain: Consumers want full transparency. Nearly nine in 10 adults believe that internet companies should be transparent about their methods for delivering content and should publicly disclose the algorithms they use.

 

Major internet companies as news editors ()

 

Read the full article by DCN here.

 

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