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Prince Harry guest edits National Geographic's Instagram for a day

HRH The Duke of Sussex took over National Geographic's Instagram account on Monday, September 20. 

While the National Geographic Instagram account, which reaches over 123 million followers, has long been the domain of National Geographic photographers who post to it directly, it's the first time a royal has guest-curated it.

The Duke of Sussex's Instagram takeover features images of forest canopies taken by NatGeo photographers, to celebrate the beauty and significant environmental importance of conservation. “Looking Up” celebrates the beauty of trees and the important role they play in the earth’s eco-system.

“We are delighted to partner with The Duke of Sussex to raise awareness about the importance of preserving and restoring indigenous forests,” said Susan Goldberg, editor-in-chief of National Geographic magazine, in a release. “It is now more important than ever to encourage the conservation of our natural world, and we hope this partnership will help shine a light on this key issue needed to maintain a healthy planet.”

 

 
 
 
View this post on Instagram

Photo by @sussexroyal | We are pleased to announce that Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-curating our Instagram feed today! “Hi everyone! I’m so happy to have the opportunity to continue working with @NatGeo and to guest-curate this Instagram account; it’s one of my personal favourites. Today I’m in Liwonde National Park, Malawi an important stop on our official tour of southern Africa, planting trees for the Queens Commonwealth Canopy. As part of this takeover, I am inviting you to be a part of our ‘Looking Up’ social campaign. To help launch the campaign, here is a photograph I took today here in Liwonde of Baobab trees. “#LookingUp seeks to raise awareness of the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem, and is an opportunity for all of us to take a moment, to appreciate the beauty of our surroundings. So, join us today and share your own view, by looking up! Post images of the trees in your local community using the hashtag #LookingUp. I will be posting my favourite images from @NatGeo photographers here throughout the day, and over on @sussexroyal I will be sharing some of my favourite images from everything you post. I can’t wait to see what you see when you’re #LookingUp 🌲 🌳” ••• His Royal Highness is currently on an official tour to further the Queens Commonwealth Canopy, which was launched in 2015. Commonwealth countries have been invited to submit forests and national parks to be protected and preserved as well as to plant trees. The Duke has helped QCC projects in the Caribbean, U.K., New Zealand, Australia, Botswana, Malawi, and Tonga. Now, almost 50 countries are taking part and have dedicated indigenous forests for conservation and committed to planting millions of new trees to help combat climate change. The Duke’s longtime passion for trees and forests as nature’s simple solution to the environmental issues we face has been inspired by the work he has been doing on behalf of his grandmother, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, for many years.

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National Geographic is a member of FIPP. 

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