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The secrets to creating true native to women

“To me, true native is when the journalist of the brand is really deeply involved in doing the best piece of content,” says Camilla Kjems when she attended Native Advertising DAYS 2017 in Berlin.

She is editor in chief at Femina, a Danish magazine for women, and in this interview, our peers at the Native Advertising Institute asked her about creating true native for exactly this target audience: women.

Below are hightlights from the interview which have been slightly edited for clarity.

As true a native as an editorial piece

To me, true native is when the journalist of the brand is really deeply involved in doing the best piece of content.

It’s a piece of content that would be interesting for our target group anyway, something we would do anyway and which we do true to the tone and the voice of the brand, with an angle that is catching and surprising.

It should be as true a native as an editorial piece would be.

Respect the woman and create experiences

We write for women, so the native is always with the woman in mind. The trick is to really respect where the woman is in her life, what time of the day it is, what problems she has in her life that we can help her solve.

RELATED: More publishers let their editorial team produce native advertising

When we work with women, we have all these things in mind. We also did a big research that shows that women want to experience the advertising.

So you really have to make it aesthetic so she can experience the content.

Guide her – right now!

You also have to guide her. A woman has a lot of different choices, so you really have to guide her all the way through. And you also have to make a call to action.

If it’s a native advertising from a product and she really likes the piece, you have to show her where she can buy the stuff. Now! Not tomorrow, right now. Because the woman we write to is a very, very busy woman.

RELATED: What’s trending right now? Looking into four native ad studios

A woman likes to really expand the field of interest. She is very curious and when she googles things, she has ten Google things open. 

A woman wants to have all the aspects: How can it help me? How does it feel? How does it smell? She has to experience every piece of detail in it.

RELATED: Three things you need to know about your audience to create perfect native ads

Brands are afraid to go true native

The biggest challenge, when I work with brands, is that still a lot of brands don’t have the courage to go true native. They still want to have the logo to be very dominant in the piece.

They want to tell specific things and sometimes we can tell them, well, maybe it’s interesting for you that you produced your product in a very special place in Thailand, but the woman doesn’t care about that.

RELATED: How Garnier boosted young girls’ self-confidence and hereby their brand

So you have to get the advertiser to see that these kind of stories are not interesting for the target group. They think it’s interesting but the woman doesn’t.

A part of the work is to convince and to inform the brand that we know which stories convince the user, or fascinates the user. They have to rely on us.

We always want what’s the best for the brand, but we know how to communicate. Sometimes it’s not the way that they think it should be, so we have to make them trust us that we make the best solutions, the most capturing solutions for the users.

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